bbook
bbook:

As a parent there’s a time when you have to start to make an effort to get to know your kids as separate human beings, and they have to look at you differently and not just as a parent. That’s a very worthwhile challenge because I’m sure when you’re around your parents you’re not exactly the way you are around your friends, and no matter how cool you are, you’re still the mom. Also I’m traveling a lot more and going to festivals and doing the things I really wanted to do when I was home. So my kids are like, what’s up with you and I tell them that this is actually who I was before I had you—so who are you? Let’s start from there.
Susan Sarandon on ‘The Last of Robin Hood,’ Toxic Relationships, and Discovering ‘The Bachelor’

This article may be amazing but who the hell can look past that photo.

bbook:

As a parent there’s a time when you have to start to make an effort to get to know your kids as separate human beings, and they have to look at you differently and not just as a parent. That’s a very worthwhile challenge because I’m sure when you’re around your parents you’re not exactly the way you are around your friends, and no matter how cool you are, you’re still the mom. Also I’m traveling a lot more and going to festivals and doing the things I really wanted to do when I was home. So my kids are like, what’s up with you and I tell them that this is actually who I was before I had you—so who are you? Let’s start from there.

Susan Sarandon on ‘The Last of Robin Hood,’ Toxic Relationships, and Discovering ‘The Bachelor’

This article may be amazing but who the hell can look past that photo.

indeedascholar

galesofnovember:

liketheghost:

so is it a thing in (american) english to use “texas” as a word for like, something that’s out of control or chaotic, or as like, “crazy”? like “that party last weekend was totally texas!” 

because that is a thing people say in norwegian and i just think it’s important for americans to know that? 

this is the best thing I’ve ever heard

I’ve never been prouder to be a Texan.

carrionlaughing

brentofthefabulouswild:

Incredible concept art sketches created by production designer Ondrej Nekvasil for Bong Joon-Ho’s visionary science fiction film, “Snowpiercer”.

+++

01. Typical view of a cramped, dark, and grimy corridor within the residential areas of the Tail Section.

02. Gilliam’s Tent, located at the very end of the Snowpiercer, as seen on the outside.

03. Living spaces inside the Tail Section intended to mimic the claustrophobic feel of slums in third-world countries.

04. A sketch depicting a violent, blood-soaked scene onboard the train, which was eventually realized in the film as the memorable battle between the Tail Section rebels and the Front Section soldiers at the Yekaterina Bridge and Tunnel.

05. A verdant rendering of the Greenhouse Section, where it marks the first time the Tail Section rebels encounter the vivid colors of the train. Notice a key difference: the old lady in the sketch is reading a book, whereas in the film, she is leisurely doing her knitting by the fountain.

06. Beyond the fountain stand boxes of carefully cultivated and strictly controlled plants, fruits, and vegetables all flourishing within the limited spaces of the Greenhouse Section.

07. Perhaps one of the most beautiful parts of the Snowpiercer that made Yona Minsoo stare in joyous wonder: a floor-to-ceiling wraparound Aquarium Section filled with marine life.

Salman Rushdie’s Perfect “Outside the Whale”

image

(isn’t brownface fun?)

I was led through the variegated paths of the interweb to Outside the Whale, Rushdie’s perfectly angry essay about sentimental (and racist) representations of the British Raj. Some highlights follow:

On David Lean’s proprietary dickishness:

Lest we begin to console ourselves that the painful experiences are coming to an end, we are reminded that David Lean’s film of A Passage to India is in the offing. I remember seeing an interview with Mr Lean in The Times, in which he explained his reasons for wishing to make a film of Forster’s novel. ‘I haven’t seen Dickie Attenborough’s Gandhi yet,’ he said, ‘but as far as I’m aware, nobody has yet succeeded in putting India on the screen.’ The Indian film industry, from Satyajit Ray to Mr N. T. Rama Rao, will no doubt feel suitably humbled by the great man’s opinion.

On preposterous casting:

True, Indian actors were allowed to play the villains…. Meanwhile, the good-guy roles were firmly commandeered by Ben Cross, Christopher Lee, Omar Sharif, and, most memorably, Amy Irving as the good princess, whose make-up person obviously believed that Indian princesses dip their eyes in black ink and get suntans on their lips.

On the hilarious result of this preposterous casting:

"The two central characters, both supposedly raised as Indians, have been lobotomized to the point of being incapable of pronouncing their own names. The man calls himself ‘A Shock’, and the woman ‘An Jooly’. Around and about them there is branding of human flesh and snakery and widow-burning by the natives. There are Pathans who cannot speak Pushto. And, to avoid offending the Christian market, we are asked to believe that the child ‘A Shock’, while being raised by Hindus and Muslims, somehow knew that neither ‘way’ was for him, and instinctively, when he wished to raise his voice in prayer, ‘prayed to the mountains’."

Go read the whole thing. There’s an excellent digression on Thatcher and Orwell.

In Obvious Child, Jenny Slate will take your heart in her hands and crush it in the gentlest way possible, and you won’t even notice because you’re too busy laughing.
Despite the world’s smoldering obsession with trying to define the millennial (and especially the millennial woman), we’ve seen very few of us actually represented in the media. Frances Ha probably comes closest, but even still, she’s a magically realist avatar for a certain type of striver. ”Girls”, meanwhile, presents us with an exaggerated satire of a very very specific type of woman: the privileged, the preening, the over-confident, the over-expectant, but still directionless.
Donna Stern comes to us more finished: at no moment in the film can she simply be described as crass, or compassionate, or scared, or disappointed, or hopeful, or mean, or inconsiderate, or kind, or talented, or god help us, “creative”. Slate’s performance revels in the contradictions inherent in how, like most of us, Donna is actually two, or three, or four of those things at any given moment, and each of those characteristics push and pull against each other to drive the humor and the narrative. 
I cannot stress this enough: Obvious Child is hilarious. Ignore the punditerati putting this movie down by describing it as some sort of “issues” movie. I cannot remember the last time I actually broke out laughing so much.

In Obvious Child, Jenny Slate will take your heart in her hands and crush it in the gentlest way possible, and you won’t even notice because you’re too busy laughing.

Despite the world’s smoldering obsession with trying to define the millennial (and especially the millennial woman), we’ve seen very few of us actually represented in the media. Frances Ha probably comes closest, but even still, she’s a magically realist avatar for a certain type of striver. ”Girls”, meanwhile, presents us with an exaggerated satire of a very very specific type of woman: the privileged, the preening, the over-confident, the over-expectant, but still directionless.

Donna Stern comes to us more finished: at no moment in the film can she simply be described as crass, or compassionate, or scared, or disappointed, or hopeful, or mean, or inconsiderate, or kind, or talented, or god help us, “creative”. Slate’s performance revels in the contradictions inherent in how, like most of us, Donna is actually two, or three, or four of those things at any given moment, and each of those characteristics push and pull against each other to drive the humor and the narrative. 

I cannot stress this enough: Obvious Child is hilarious. Ignore the punditerati putting this movie down by describing it as some sort of “issues” movie. I cannot remember the last time I actually broke out laughing so much.

thestrengthofmylife
It took Adolf Hitler and his Nazi cohorts 12 years to round up and murder 6 million Jews, but their Teutonic cousins, the British, managed to kill almost 4 million Indians in just over a year, with Prime Minister Winston Churchill cheering from the sidelines. Australian biochemist Dr Gideon Polya has called the Bengal Famine a “manmade holocaust” because Churchill’s policies were directly responsible for the disaster. Bengal had a bountiful harvest in 1942, but the British started diverting vast quantities of food grain from India to Britain, contributing to a massive food shortage in the areas comprising present-day West Bengal, Odisha, Bihar and Bangladesh. Author Madhusree Mukerjee tracked down some of the survivors and paints a chilling picture of the effects of hunger and deprivation. In Churchill’s Secret War, she writes: “Parents dumped their starving children into rivers and wells. Many took their lives by throwing themselves in front of trains. Starving people begged for the starchy water in which rice had been boiled. Children ate leaves and vines, yam stems and grass. People were too weak even to cremate their loved ones.”

Remembering India’s Forgotten Holocaust. 

Sarah Waheed notes: “One of the students in my modern South Asia history class a few years ago, was extremely upset that the book we were reading referred to the Bengal famine as a holocaust, calling the author ‘biased’. When I asked him to clarify and elaborate upon what he meant by ‘biased’, he exclaimed, inflamed, “There was only one holocaust!” The rest of the students were, however, more open to the idea of the 20th century being a century of multiple holocausts. The terms ‘holocaust’ and ‘genocide’, however, continue to elicit trauma envy.”

(via mehreenkasana)

I first heard of British crimes like this in Mike Davis’ Late Victorian Holocausts which talks about how imperialism affected the Indian subcontinent’s food supply. The system which could feed everyone, even during hard times, was “centralized” to be “more efficient” by the British administration, leading to skyrocketing poverty and famine and a destroyed local ecology. 

(via jhameia)

Yeah Churchill. What a hero.