Who often gets asked about television as a whole? About people of color on television? About black women on television? Who’s expected to act as broadcast television’s conscience and diversity czar? Shonda Rhimes. And every minute she’s asked to spend serving that function, valuable and necessary as it is, and perfectly understandable as it is that people are curious about her experiences, is a minute she’s not answering the same questions Damon Lindelof gets, or Joss Whedon gets, or Chuck Lorre gets.

The whole brilliant thing.

Though I would add that Mindy Kaling gets hit on this all the time too, and is very vocal about how problematic it is.

Despite the fact that this episode centered on the loss of a parent, there wasn’t a big emotional crying scene. I’ve realized more and more that when the characters’ histrionics overwhelm the scene, there’s no room left for the audience to connect emotionally.

In just ten quiet seconds, we feel the weight of the moment when Clara’s forced to give up her mother’s ring. The Doctor asking her to make that sacrifice clearly plants a seed of doubt in her mind about him, and reminds us that no matter how much he walks the walk, he’s not actually human.”


Read more: http://theoncominghope.blogspot.com/2013/04/doctor-who-and-rings-of-clara-khenaten.html#ixzz2PnhOg1uz

In season one, the relationship between Brody and Carrie made a most peculiar sense, as it was entirely premised on discovery. But now there’s at least one scene a week which conveys how strongly Carrie wants Brody to leave his family, of how she’s willing to compromise missions to save him, of how her love saves him from the edge (lately, we’re getting all three of these in every episode).
This has the double effect of reducing the stakes of the ongoing terror plot (it’s ok! Love will save us all!) and of infantilizing the moral questions that plague Brody.
"The SNL sketch that ate Homeland": http://theoncominghope.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-snl-sketch-that-ate-homeland.html#ixzz2E0DegkLR

In season one, the relationship between Brody and Carrie made a most peculiar sense, as it was entirely premised on discovery. But now there’s at least one scene a week which conveys how strongly Carrie wants Brody to leave his family, of how she’s willing to compromise missions to save him, of how her love saves him from the edge (lately, we’re getting all three of these in every episode).

This has the double effect of reducing the stakes of the ongoing terror plot (it’s ok! Love will save us all!) and of infantilizing the moral questions that plague Brody.


I’m more than intrigued by the new tone the show’s adopting. The show’s always been happiest in the moral grey area, but its ethos always centered on Newton’s third law - every action leads to an equal or opposite reaction - which, in The Good Wife, means that even the direst consequences stem from an action taken, even if those actions are long-forgotten.

But then, most of the driving factors from the episode centered from something that didn’t happen, a void of an intern who seems to have a black hole in her head. That Peter didn’t actually sleep with her turns the narrative into a Greek tragedy - Maddy found the excuse she needed to turn on Peter (indeed, it seems like she was looking for that excuse from the start), and the blogger hurls away from the void in his own rocketship, powered by grist from the rumor-mill.

Read more on The Good Wife: “Waiting for the Knock”: http://theoncominghope.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-good-wife-season-4-for-knock-or-eli.html#ixzz2B7IJF5Qo

I’m more than intrigued by the new tone the show’s adopting. The show’s always been happiest in the moral grey area, but its ethos always centered on Newton’s third law - every action leads to an equal or opposite reaction - which, in The Good Wife, means that even the direst consequences stem from an action taken, even if those actions are long-forgotten.

But then, most of the driving factors from the episode centered from something that didn’t happen, a void of an intern who seems to have a black hole in her head. That Peter didn’t actually sleep with her turns the narrative into a Greek tragedy - Maddy found the excuse she needed to turn on Peter (indeed, it seems like she was looking for that excuse from the start), and the blogger hurls away from the void in his own rocketship, powered by grist from the rumor-mill.

Read more on The Good Wife: “Waiting for the Knock”: http://theoncominghope.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-good-wife-season-4-for-knock-or-eli.html#ixzz2B7IJF5Qo

"There’s a wife and an ex-lover and they don’t even talk about relationships. They talk about their roles in the world as they envision it; protecting Fitz, and by extension, their life’s work. Their mutual respect and professional need for cooperation, supersede anything so quotidian as stereotypical female jealousy.”

Scandal already earned a certain amount of goodwill from me for its African-American female showrunner and African-American female lead (seriously, when’s the last time those conditions happened on their own, let alone in tandem).

But goodwill rarely translates to love. Goodwill’s the annoying kid sister of love, or that boy who’s so nice to you that you really want to like him, who treats you so superficially wellthat you stay faithful to him for months on end despite flavorless sex and a deep-seated yet ever-increasing disdain for his total obliviousness to how you really feel about him.

Luckily the show quickly surpassed my highest expectations.


Read more about Why You Need To Watch Scandal:  http://theoncominghope.blogspot.com/2012/10/why-you-need-to-watch-scandal.html#ixzz28dYtdnVq

The New Inquiry on Race and Last Resort

But, as Black men entered all facets of American life and became not just NFL quarterbacks and NFL head coaches but also CEOs, mayors, governors and secretary of state, television proved largely unwilling to explore these exemplars of success on either the small or big screen. There seems to be an inverse correlation between the real life achievement of Black men (and other men of color, and women) in the United States and the willingness of popular culture to explore seriously the ramifications of these achievements. This reluctance has only deepened during the first term of the Obama presidency.

Great piece on race, television and Last Resort:

Weren’t we going to have some babies of color?” she asks the crew. “We’re going to have all white babies?”

She doesn’t sound upset, just surprised and amused that the shot isn’t as she’d imagined it. Kaling is, after all, filming a world of her own making — the fake doctors’ office of The Mindy Project, the new Fox comedy she created, writes, produces, and stars in. When it debuts this month, it will make Kaling one of the only women of color to be both the face of and the creative force behind a network TV show.

Read more: http://www.vulture.com/2012/09/mindy-kaling-mindy-project.html

A Town Called Mercy grapples with a particularly messy issue - is the Doctor really a hero, or is he the intergalactic equivalent of the IMF, an arbiter of “correct behavior” with a worldview and a mission statement that refuses to adapt to cultural differences?

As in School Reunion, Toby Whithouse takes full advantage of the meta-concept that he Doctor may be the protagonist of this show called Doctor Who, but within the narrative universe, he’s really just a minor character. All that business about being The Oncoming Storm really doesn’t affect the day-to-day lives of, well, anyone in the universe.

Read more on A Town Called Mercy: http://theoncominghope.blogspot.com/2012/09/a-town-called-mercy-or-doctor-grapples.html#ixzz26aGXe5vF

"With Twin Peaks, Lynch/Frost have achieved the impossible — a show where bad acting actually heightens its sense of atmosphere. The gurning, the posing, even the sheer emoting, never quite seem out of place. Sure, there’s a murder mystery, but who the hell cares? We want to see Dale Cooper, eccentricating himself up all over the place. We want to see Audrey Horne, Veronica Mars-ing her way through leches and peons alike.”